Click on the plant's Latin name to view a list of common names associated with it
 
 

Hits 1 to 9 of 9 matching Bog Moss

1
Click here to comment on this record
Sphagnum
at Langholme, in Dumfriesshire, the Duke of Buccleuch's head keeper would: take us out on the hill to pick sphagnum moss as a part of the war effort. We would collect it in sacks, and then lay it across the lawn on dust sheets to dry. Afterwards all the bits of heather and peat, dead frogs and other foreign bodies had to be picked out of it before it could be sent to the hospital. There it was used in stead of cottonwool for swabbing out wounds - being full of iodine it was a good disinfectant. [Gloucester, 1983: 49]

Bibliographic reference: Vickery, R. (1995) A dictionary of plant lore. Oxford University Press, Oxford.


2
Click here to comment on this record
Sphagnum
On the outbreak of the late war a still wider economic use was found for this moss, as a dressing of wounds, and an interesting industry sprang up for war-workers living where this moss grows, mainly in Scotland, Ireland, Wales and Devon, much having also been collected from the Yorkshire moors, the Lake District and the Wye Valley. [Information from Mary Grieve's 'Modern Herbal', from the website - www.botanical.com]

Bibliographic reference: Grieve, M. (1930) A modern Herbal. Jonathan Cape, London.


3
Click here to comment on this record
Sphagnum
--Preparation of the Dressings---The moss after being dried and carefully picked over is now ready for the dressings. All used in home hospitals is put up loosely in small, flat muslin bags, of a fairly close but very thin muslin, the bags only being loosely filled (as a rule 2 OZ. of the moss to each bag, 10 inches by 14 inches), as allowance has to be made for the way in which the moss swells on being brought into contact with moisture. Sphagnum Moss pads are supplied both plain and sterilized (sublimated), some hospitals preferring to sterilize them themselves, but a considerable proportion being sterilized at the depots and sent out ready for use. The filled bags are passed through a solution of corrosive sublimate by a worker in rubber gloves, squeezed through a little mangle and dried again, that they may return to the specified weight, for after the bath they are 2 OZ. too heavy. The object of sublimating the moss is not for any antiseptic effect on a wound (as of course it does not come into direct contact with the skin) but to neutralize the discharge which may come through the inner dressings. For use in field-hospitals, etc., the moss is packed in compressed cakes cut to a certain size, which are more conveniently packed for sending abroad than the soft dressings, these small slabs being also placed, each in a muslin bag, very much too large for the size of the dry cake put in them, for obvious reasons. There was a munition factory in Scotland, where much of the moss was sublimated and part of it compressed by hydraulic power into these cakes. The very hydraulic press which one hour was moulding shell bases, was in the next devoting its energy to compressing the healing cakes of Sphagnum Moss. [Information from Mary Grieve's 'Modern Herbal', from the website - www.botanical.com]

Bibliographic reference: Grieve, M. (1930) A modern Herbal. Jonathan Cape, London.


4
Click here to comment on this record
Sphagnum
Sphagnum Moss was also used during the War in conjunction with Garlic, one of the best antiseptics. The Government bought up tons of the bulbs, which were sent out to the front; the raw juice expressed, diluted with water, was put on swabs of sterilized Sphagnum Moss and applied to wounds. Where this treatment was adopted there were no specific complications, and thousands of lives were thus saved. [Information from Mary Grieve's 'Modern Herbal', from the website - www.botanical.com]


5
Click here to comment on this record
Sphagnum
John Lightfoot's authoritative (for its time) Flora Scotica makes a particular point about the fact that mosses should not be overlooked and disregarded. In the case of the Sphagnum 'bog-mosses', he has this to say. It is generally believed that the roots and decay'd stalks of this moss constitute a principle part of that useful bituminous substance call'd peat, which is the chief fuel for the Northern regions. So that those parts of the creation, which to the inconsiderate mind of man, appear in the most trifling and insignificant, will be found, upon the mature enquiry, to be ordain'd by Providence for the wisest and most gracious purposes. This is certainly a valid point, no matter what your interpretation of who, or what 'Providence' might be.

Bibliographic reference: Lightfoot, J. (1777) Flora Scotica. B. White, London.


6
Click here to comment on this record
Sphagnum
Sphagnum has been put to use in a wide variety of roles due to its absorbent qualities. As a nappy and sanitary towel, the water absorbing and holding properties of this moss were extremely useful. When dry, it was thought to be mildly antiseptic and, indeed, it has been shown that many mosses, including Sphagnum, contain antimicrobial secondary metabolites. Sphagnum was, therefore, well suited for use as a packing material for wounds, absorbing lost blood and fluids, as well as providing a degree of infection - resistance. A bronze age warrior found in Lothian had his chest packed with Sphagnum, it is thought in an to attempt to heal a wound, although it obviously failed. This practice has had a lengthy history, as, when cotton dressings were becoming scarce during the Napoleonic wars, Highland soldiers instigated the use of Sphagnum dressings in the army and it was also used as the basis for wound dressings as recently as the World Wars. In fact, it is estimated that Sphagnum dressing production during World War I was around half a million kilos per month (approximately 1 million dressings)! One of the major sources of Sphagnum for this purpose was the Highlands. During this period, collection was well organised, the moss was collected by hand, with any convenient implement being used to help, such as rakes or garden forks. It was then squeezed by hand, or else by jumping on the sacks into which the Sphagnum was put. This served to expel at least some of the water the plants contained. Other plant matter was then sorted from the rest of the moss and it was carried by cart to the nearest railway for shipment to the processing plants. Sphagnum was said to be more absorbent, and absorbs liquids more uniformly throughout its surface than cotton dressings. It also had the added benefit of being less irritating to open wounds than the more typical cotton dressings. Despite this, after the end of the wars, when cotton was no longer at a premium, the use of Sphagnum dressings died out. OTHER REFERENCES: , [Asakawa, Y. (1990) Terpenoids & aromatic compounds with pharmacological activity from bryophytes. In. Zinmeister, H. D. & Mues, R. (Eds.) Bryophytes, their chemistry and chemical taxonomy Clarendon Press, Oxford.], [Darwin, T. (1995) A Scots herbal. Mercat Press, Edinburgh.], [Fisk, R. J. (1992) Collecting Sphagnum for surgical dressings. Bulletin of the British Bryological society. 59: 32-33.], [Thieret, J. W. (1956) Bryophytes as economic plants. Economic botany 10: 75-91].

Bibliographic reference: Beith, M. (1995). Healing threads. Polygon, Edinburgh.


7
Click here to comment on this record
Sphagnum
The Reverend Adam Forman, who was one of the principle organisers of Sphagnum collection in the Lowlands during the First World War, was responsible for many of the innovations used in collecting the moss. He invented a 'moss mover', a kind of monorail handcart, which was pushed along logs and laden with the sacks of moss for transport between the lorries and processing plant. The Reverend Forman also produced a memo on efficient, economical moss gathering for the benefit of other organisations. Following, are some extracts from this work (taken from Fisk 1992): camp the workers on, or near the moor, with transport stationed near at hand. Where this is impossible workers must be conveyed to and from the moors, and much valuable time and transport is expended on the journey. . . . . .Workers should start in line and keep in line. . . . . . .Workers should not bring their own food. It should be provided for all and be made as simple as possible. Meal times should be set, and the food made ready for the workers. - A large kettle of fish is useful and beyond this, and cups, no utensils are necessary. . . . . . All gatherers should understand that they are doing 'essential war work' and should undertake to carry out instructions. Where civilian and military workers are mixed, the civilians must obey orders on a par with military workers. . . . . . . . .Owing to the present congested condition of the railways, wagons must be loaded and unloaded quickly. - Wagons must be ordered ahead, and due consideration must be paid to the present over-worked condition of the railway staff. This work on moss gathering for the War effort was eventually to earn Forman a CBE.

Bibliographic reference: Fisk, R. J. (1992) Collecting Sphagnum for surgical dressings. Bulletin of the British Bryological Society. 59: 32-33.


8
Click here to comment on this record
Sphagnum
Keith Whellans was approached by Booth Moss and Foliage (Wales) to collect Sphagnum moss for them. Keith says there is an unlimited demand for Sphagnum moss for hanging baskets and Christmas decorations, but the harvest is not very sustainable. Sphagnum is collected from bogs and peatland. He will, however, consider getting involved in this activity next winter.

Information obtained from: Keith Whellans, Whellans, Keith


9
Click here to comment on this record
Sphagnum
In the Bronze age burial site at Ashgrove, Fife, a considerable wad of sphagnum moss was found packed against the chest of the corpse. It has been suggested that this was in order to act as a wound dressing.

Bibliographic reference: Dickson, J. H. (1978) Bronze age mead. Antiquity LII: 108-113.



No more hits


Search Again